Sunday, September 30, 2007

 LOCOS, DREAMERS AND VISIONARIES




Celebrating Los MacArturos:

Locos, Dreamers and Visionaries!






Geniuses in the Making Project


We present to you our work. We consider ourselves Geniuses in the Making and we would like to help teachers in the Geniuses in the Making of all their students. This blog was developed by graduate students in the Doctor of Philosophy degree in the culture, literacy and language program from the Division of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio. The blog consists of lesson plans aimed at secondary students but each lesson plan can be adapted for lower grades. We have also included resource materials for the successful implementation of the lessons.

Within this program, Professor Dr. Ellen Riojas Clark teaches our advanced doctoral seminar BBL 7253 Latino Issues in Education. This seminar examines many of the key issues in the education of Latino students. It presents the experiences of a range of different Latino ethnic groups who often share the same struggles in U.S. schools. The course begins with a critical look at how Latino students have been socially constructed and moves toward a greater understanding of the political, social, and economic forces shaping the challenges that Latinos have faced in accessing education in this country In essence, the field reflects a dire need for curricula that can interest, motivate, and stimulate Latina/o students, in their self-concept and academic quest. We hope to address this need with these lesson plans. We invite you to attend the events so that you can personally experience the power of the MacArturo Latino Geniuses.


Ph.D. in Culture, Literacy, and Language students:
Malena Salazar, Irma Vargas Rosas, Jessica Muniz, Carmen Guzman-Martinez, Lora Beth Escalante, Claudia Treviño Garcia, and Lorena Claeys


Professor:
Dr. Ellen Riojas Clark
Contact: ellen.clark@utsa.edu
Division of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies
University of Texas at San Antonio

Presented at the Texas Association for Bilingual Education Annual Conference, San Antonio, TX, October 4, 2007.





 INVITATIONS & POSTERS

Invitation:














Posters:



Thursday, September 27, 2007

 GENIUSES IN THE MAKING! WHO WE ARE




Dear reader(s),

With guidance from our own homegrown genius, Dr. Ellen Riojas Clark, we have set out to create lesson plans highlighting the contributions of Latino MacArthur (los MacArturos) fellowship award recipients. We hope you enjoy exploring this site and find our lesson plans useful as reference material for your classroom. Although we have tried to incorporate as many aspects as we deemed necessary, should you find any gaps or oversights that require changes, please do not hesitate to let us know. As you can see, we are open to suggestions and welcome your constructive comments.

We hope you enjoy this site. Its contents reference links from many other very interesting sources for teachers, as well as for the general public, who might be interested in further investigating the MacArturos.

Sincerely,

Carmen, Claudia, Irma, Jessica, Lora Beth, Lorena, Malena, and Dr. Clark


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Carmen Guzman-Martinez

Carmen is currently a doctoral student in the Bicultural-Bilingual Studies department. She was born and raised in San Antonio, TX. Her research interests include cultural studies, critical pedagogy, promotoras, and community based organizations. She is involved in UTSA's Mexican American Studies Student Organization (MASSO) and the National Association for Chicano and Chicana Studies (NACCS). She also works as a teaching assistant in the department and has taught BBL 3403-Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in a Pluralistic Society and BBL 3033-Mexican Americans in the Southwest.


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Claudia Treviño-García
Loca, Dreamer and Visionary: Claudia Treviño García is a first generation Mexicana/Chicana. She has a B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies with Bilingual/ESL Education Certification and an M.A. In Bicultural-Bilingual Education, both from the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). She taught 13 years in the San Antonio Independent School District, 10 of which were at Storm Elementary, a Dual Language Campus. She is currently in her second year of her doctoral studies at the UTSA. Her research interests include, teacher retention, pre-service teacher preparation, induction year support and teacher ethnic identity. She is currently the Assistant Director for the Academy for Teacher Excellence. She currently lives in San Antonio, Texas with her husband Gus and their three children Gustavo (18), Carolina (17) and Jonathan (12).

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Irma Vargas Rosas

Irma Vargas Rosas is first generation Chicana, born and raised in Chicago, IL. She has three degrees from the University of IL, Chicago. She obtained a B.A. in Political Science and Spanish in 1996. Then she continued and obtained two masters degrees: an M.A. in Hispanic Studies specializing in Applied Linguistics in 1998 and M.Ed. specializing in Bilingual Education in 2003. She was a classroom teacher for several years in Chicago and in San Antonio, Texas and has experience in dual language, transitional bilingual, and ESL programs. She is currently a doctoral student in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Texas, San Antonio in the Culture, Literacy, and Language Program. She currently lives in San Antonio with her partner Rita and their two perritos Corbatín and Lalito.

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Jessica Muniz

Jessica B. Muniz, LMSW is currently a doctoral student in the Bicultural-Bilingual Studies department. She was born and raised in San Antonio, Texas and has lived here her entire life. She currently works at UTSA as a psychotherapist in the Counseling Services department. She received her BA in 1998 and her MSW in 2001 from OLLU. Jessica is the proud mother of 4 children ages 18, 16, 11, and 8 and is happily married to Ben. The identity of being mother, wife, professional, student, and Latina is the focus of research that Jessica wishes to investigate, hence her decision to pursue a PhD in Culture, Language and Literacy. How do Latinas continuously live within the borders of their daily lives and still maintain a sense of identity independent from the cultural worlds that define their gender roles? These lived experiences are interwoven daily as Jessica navigates her life. Specifically Jessica has become interested in studying gender and culture and its impact on the educational paths that Latinas follow. Jessica is interested in narratives or testimonios of young Latinas who continue to pursue higher education and how that success changes their lived experiences. If Jessica had time and money for a hobby, she would spend time traveling!


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Lora Beth Escalante

Lora Beth is a doctoral student in the Bilingual-Bicultural Department at the University of Texas at San Antonio.Previously, she taught third grade in a bilingual classroom for five years with Denver Public Schools and has participatedin district-wide curriculum development. Her teaching passion is second language acquisition and teacher professional development.


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Lorena Claeys

I was born in Laredo Texas and raised in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, México. I moved to Corpus Christi, TX at the age of 15. I graduated from Del Mar College with an Associate of Arts Degree. I also obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Interdisciplinary Studies and Masters’ Degrees in Curriculum & Instruction and Educational Administration from Texas A&M University. I taught ESL through the content areas of mathematics and science to middle level recent immigrant students at Martin Middle School’s New Comer Program entitled CALP in Corpus Christi ISD. As a coordinator and director I have managed and directed the implementation of Title III/VII, Title V and Transition to Teaching programs. Presently, my research interest as a PhD doctoral student and executive director for the Academy for Teacher Excellence at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) is in the area of educator preparation. Specifically, my studies focus on protective factors, motives and assets for the purpose of designing effective interventions for the preparation and retention of minority and other teacher candidates who work with culturally and linguistically diverse students.

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Malena Salazar

As a former English language learner, fully recognizing the difficulties involved in acquiring a new language, I am cognizant of the need to include cultural studies within the teaching profession, hence my interest in pursuing a Ph.D. in the areas of culture, literacy and language. Not surprisingly, my research interests are varied but tightly interlaced, woven into a fabric that incorporates culture, identity, language, and technology. To me these things are inseparable, in today’s world they go hand in hand as many of the lesson plans herein attest. My hobbies and habits are many, among the good ones is a need to document through photography (on any given day, I’ll be carrying some kind of camera), among the bad ones is my pack-rattiness…but then again, I’m an ESL teacher/ethnographer in perpetual training.

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Dr. Ellen Riojas Clark

Dr. Ellen Riojas Clark is a Professor in the Division of Bicultural Bilingual Studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She has written extensively on the relationship between the constructs of self-concept, ethnic identity, self-efficacy and good teaching. Another area of research is in the area of gifted language minority students. She has developed and presented many graduate summer institutes at UTSA that focused on Latino literature and culture, multicultural education collaborative approaches, curriculum development, cooperative learning and restructuring schools for language minority students.

Dr. Clark serves as the Research Coordinator for the Academy for Teacher Excellence, U.S. Department of Education projects. And has served as the Co-PI for the Rockefeller Foundation Project: Knowledge, Culture, and Construction of Identity in a Transnational Community: San Antonio, TX and was the Educational Content Director for the Scholastic Entertainment PBS children's cartoon series, Maya and Miguel.

She is a native San Antonian where she attended public schools including Edison High School, San Antonio College, Trinity University, UTSA, and the University of Texas at Austin where she received her Ph. D. She is the mother of two engineer daughters and the abuela of four granddaughters. Dr. Clark is one of the Dos Abuelas who write book reviews and travel articles for the Express-News.

Dr. Clark was selected as Queen Huevo by the San Anto Cultural Center and has appeared in several documentaries including Hollydays on PBS, where you can see her every Christmas making her famous tamales.
























Latino Genius: Camilo José Vergara






Latino Genius:
Camilo José Vergara












Building photo essays from the ground up:
A lesson plan based on the photography of Camilo José Vergara


Lesson plan by Malena Salazar, M.A., Doctoral Student
Division of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies
The University of Texas – San Antonio
October 2007




Every photograph, besides being a document of what the camera sees,
also testifies to the relationship between the photographer and the subject of the photo.
--Minneapolis Institute of Arts

I use photographs as a means of discovery, as a tool with which to clarify visions
and construct knowledge about a particular place, or city.
--Camilo José Vergara







BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Various electronic sources documenting the life and work of Camilo José Vergara:

Wikipedia.com (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camilo_Jos%C3%A9_Vergara):

Camilo José Vergara (b. 1944) is a Chilean-born, New York-based writer, photographer and documentarian. He was born in Santiago, Chile. Vergara is noted for photographing the same buildings and neighborhoods multiple times over many years to capture changes over time.
Vergara won a
MacArthur Foundation "genius grant" in 2002 and served as a fellow at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at Rutgers University in 2003/2004. He received the Robert E. Park Award of the American Sociological Association for "The New American Ghetto" in 1997.

In
1995, Vergara made a controversial proposal that 12 square blocks of downtown Detroit be declared a "skyscraper ruins park," an "American acropolis," for the preservation and study of the deteriorating and empty skyscrapers. "We could transform the nearly 100 troubled buildings into a grand national historic park of play and wonder, an urban Monument Valley.... Midwestern prairie would be allowed to invade from the north. Trees, vines, and wildflowers would grow on roofs and out of windows; goats and wild animals—squirrels, possum, bats, owls, ravens, snakes and insects—would live in the empty behemoths, adding their calls, hoots and screeches to the smell of rotten leaves and animal droppings." (Metropolis, April 1995).

Vergara received a B.A. (1968) in
sociology from the University of Notre Dame and an M.A. (1977) in sociology from Columbia University, where he also completed the course work for his Ph.D. (not yet awarded). His work has been published in seven books:

1989, Silent Cities: The Evolution of the American Cemetery.
ISBN 0910413223
1995, New American Ghetto.
ISBN 0813522099
1999, American Ruins.
ISBN 1580930565
2001, Twin Towers Remembered.
ISBN 1568983514
2001, Unexpected Chicagoland.
ISBN 1565847016
2004, Subway Memories.
ISBN 1580931464
2005, How the Other Half Worships.
ISBN 0813536820




Metrotimes.com (http://www.metrotimes.com/20/19/Features/culRuins.htm):

Ruins & redemption: Maybe celebrating Detroit's crumbling architecture isn't such a crazy idea after all
by Michael Haggerty
2/09/00

It’s not the kind of plan those interested in historic restoration like to hear, but Vergara’s proposal magnified the problem the abandoned buildings present as well as drawing attention to what they represent. While the current dilapidated state of buildings such as the David Broderick Tower and the Michigan Central train depot clearly indicates a decline, the buildings themselves are also symbolic of Detroit’s past achievements.

For that reason, Vergara says even if these buildings aren’t restored, they should not be destroyed. Rather, he suggests that such buildings need to be preserved as symbols of the aspirations they represented when built.

This is particularly true in Detroit, where the concentration of pre-Depression architecture is one of the largest in the country. "Where else do you have these things, and what would you replace them with if you knocked them all down?" he says.

The National Building Museum (http://www.nbm.org/Exhibits/past/2000_1996/Ghetto.html):

The New American Ghetto:Photographs of Camilo José VergaraJanuary 26 - May 5, 1996

The New American Ghetto is an exploration, conducted over nearly two decades, of some of the poorest and most segregated neighborhoods in New York, Newark, Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, and other smaller cities. Through photographs and text, I chronicle the profound transformation that these places have experienced since the riots of the 1960s. Included here are successive photographs of the same places that track change over time-the kinds of changes that have made the conditions of today's ghetto profoundly different from those of an earlier era.

My examination of scores of ghettos across the nation reveals three types: green ghettos, characterized by depopulation and by vacant land and ruins over-grown by nature; institutional ghettos, publicly financed places of confinement designed mainly for American-born minorities; and new immigrant ghettos, deriving their character from an influx of immigrants, mainly Latino and West Indian. The New American Ghetto illustrates the ongoing entropy and struggling reconstruction existing in our urban centers today. Some communities have continued to lose population; others have emerged from what were once ethnic, blue-collar neighborhoods; some sections of older ghettos have remained stable, working neighborhoods or have been rebuilt. Cityscapes that were once central to the life and identity of the nation are vanishing, raising fundamental questions: Do we want cities? And how do we interpret what is left behind?





LESSON PLAN

Lesson Plan Title
Building photo essays from the ground up: A lesson plan based on the photography of Camilo José Vergara

Overview of Lesson Plan
In this lesson, students will consider the contexts in which photographs are taken and create original photo essays on topics of their choice.

Learning Level
Grades: 6-8, 9-12TEKS
§110.49. Analysis of Visual Media (One-Half Credit).
(b) Knowledge and skills.
(1) The student recognizes/interprets visual representations as they apply to visual media. The student is expected to:
(A) identify the historical development of visual media;
(B) distinguish the purposes of various media forms such as information, entertainment, and persuasion; and
(C) recognize strategies used by media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture such as advertising, perpetuation of stereotypes, use of visual representations, special effects, and language.
(2) The student analyzes and critiques the significance of visual representations. The student is expected to:
(C) analyze techniques used in visual media;
(D) explore the emotional and intellectual effects of visual media on viewers

Lesson Duration
2 sessions, 1 hour

Learning Location
Language Arts Classroom or Journalism (with computer access for students)

Learning Objectives
Students will:
1. Analyze photographs to discover their contexts.
2. Consider the influence of photographer Camilo José Vergara on by reading and discussing the website Invincible Cities,
http://invinciblecities.camden.rutgers.edu/intro.html
3. Explore Camilo José Vergara’s philosophy about taking pictures of semi-ruined, abandoned buildings; research images on a particular topic in preparation for taking their own pictures on the same topic.
4. Create original photo essays and artist statements.

Resources / Materials
photographs by Camilo José Vergara (images projected onto a screen); images can be found online at Invincible Cities, http://invinciblecities.camden.rutgers.edu/intro.html
pens/pencils
paper
classroom board
copies of Site Introduction by Camilo Vergara found online at
http://invinciblecities.camden.rutgers.edu/intro.html (one per student)
resources that contain photographs that may interest students; found in photography books, periodicals, reference books, computers with Internet access, etc.
digital or disposable cameras (one per student)
computers for students to download and print digital photographs

Activities / Procedures
Step 1. WARM-UP/DO-NOW:
Prior to class, prepare a projector to show the series of photographs taken by Camilo José Vergara found in Invincible Cities, http://invinciblecities.camden.rutgers.edu/intro.html .
As students enter the room, ask them to examine the images.
As a class, discuss the following questions for each photograph (written on the board or overhead):
-What are these pictures of?
-What do you think the real-life context is for these pictures?
-Why do you think they were taken?
-What title would you give this series of photographs? Why?

After discussing the series of photographs, read aloud the caption or accompanying text, as well as the title. Then ask students the following questions (written on the board or overhead):-How do the photographs capture the context?-What was happening when the picture was taken?

Step 2. CLASS READ AND DISCUSS SITE INTRODUCTION.
Have the class read and discuss copies of SITE INTRODUCTION by Camilo Vergara found online as pdf files at http://invinciblecities.camden.rutgers.edu/Images%20as%20a%20Tool%20of%20Discovery.pdf
focusing on the following questions:
a. Who is Camilo José Vergara?
b. What type of work does he do?
c. Why does he employ the use of still photography?
d. What is he trying to accomplish with his photography? Why?
e. How does Camilo José Vergara chose his subject?

Step 3. CLASS DISCUSSION OF QUOTE.
As a class, discuss the following quotation by Camilo José Vergara:

“For me a visual history of urban America organized around portraits of minority residents would be very limited. People are often engaging; their feelings and emotions are moving; yet it is often difficult to know much about them from photographic likenesses. I found that images of the physical communities in which people live often better reveal the choices made by residents and city officials over the long haul. When presented together as a series, photographs of the built environment constitute the essential element of an urban history told from the ground up. I use photographs as a means of discovery, as a tool with which to clarify visions and construct knowledge about a particular place, or city.”

Ask students the following questions:
What does this quotation mean to you?
What topics is he talking about?
List these topics on the board, as well as any other ideas that may be relevant to this quotation. Topics may include the ghetto, poverty, race, politics, pollution, education, urban life, etc.

Pair work:
Divide the class into pairs.
Explain that each pair will be creating a photo essay that will include at least five photographs with captions.
What issue, event, location, person, movement, etc. is worth documenting?
What images would help to capture that issue, event, location, person, movement, etc.?
Allow students time to choose a subject from those previously written on the board or come up with their own.
Once student pairs have agreed on their subjects, allow time for them to research existing photographs.
Encourage students to take notes on the kinds of images they find, and to answer the following guiding questions (written on the board or copied into a handout):-How has the issue, event, location, person, movement, etc. been captured to date?-Which images are most effective? Why?-Which images are least effective? Why?-What images would make your subject appear ordinary or clichéd?-Discuss new ways your subject can be photographed, including contexts, locations, angles, etc.

Step 4. WRAP-UP/HOMEWORK:
Student pairs take pictures for their photo essays and develop or print them. They then choose the five images that best illustrate their thoughts as reviewed during the main activity. Student pairs then write captions for each image. Individually, students prepare artist statements expressing what they hope others will learn from their photo essays. Students present photo essays with captions, along with their artist statements, in a future class as part of a photojournalism exhibit.

Further Questions for Discussion:
-Why do people take pictures?-How are photographs used in your everyday life?-How can the use of photographs enhance the landscape of a city?-Why might an influential photographer/artist not be very well-known?

Evaluation / Assessment

Students will be evaluated based on participation in class and pair discussions, thorough research and analyses of images on their chosen topics, completion of photo essays, and thoughtful artist statements. Refer to Addendums A and B for grading rubrics.

[CLICK HERE FOR ADDENDUM A HYPERLINK AND ADDENDUM B HYPERLINK]


Vocabulary

rehabilitation, abandonment, visual history, fortification, empty lots, visual language of art and advertisement, social containers, public billboards, urbanization, ethnography



Extension Activities

1. Write an essay explaining how a photograph is different from a painting, sculpture, dance, or song.
2. Create an illustrated timeline of Camilo José Vergara’s career and body of works. Include images that have helped to define his work as a photographer and ethnographer.
3. Interview a family member about a mentor he or she has had. Explore the ways this mentor influenced his or her life. Prepare a newspaper article illustrating your findings.

Technology related exploration - Research the photography equipment used by Camilo José Vergara. Choose one, and create a “How It Works” poster. Write a brief essay comparing this piece of equipment to a camera you could use for your photo essay.


References

Camilo José Vergara. (2006, October 24). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved September 13, 2007, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Camilo_Jos%C3%A9_Vergara&oldid=83459666

Haggerty, M. (2000, February 9). Ruins & redemption: Maybe celebrating Detroit's crumbling architecture isn't such a crazy idea after all. Metrotimes. Retrieved September 11, 2007, from
http://www.metrotimes.com/20/19/Features/culRuins.htm

Minneapolis Institute of Arts. (n.d.). Get the picture: Liebling. In Retrieved September 22, 2007, from
http://www.artsmia.org/get-the-picture/liebling/frame05.html

Sale, M. & Anderson, B. (2006, October 20). The candid camera: Creating photo essays that keep it real. The New York Times Company. Retrieved September 12, 2007, from
http://www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/20061020friday.html

The National Building Museum. (1996). The new American ghetto: Photographs of Camilo José Vergara (January 26 - May 5, 1996). Retrieved September 14, 2007, from
http://www.nbm.org/Exhibits/past/2000_1996/Ghetto.html

Vergara, C. J. & Gillette, H. (2005). Invincible Cities. Retrieved September 12, 2007, from
http://invinciblecities.camden.rutgers.edu/intro.html




Latino Genius: Baldemar Velazquez


Latino Genius: Baldemar Velazquez
(Farm Labor Leader)

Lesson plans created by Irma Vargas Rosas, M.A., M.Ed, doctoral student
Program in Culture, Literacy, and Language
Division of Bilingual Bicultural Studies
University of Texas, San Antonio

Lesson Plan Title – Critical Evaluation, Writing & Art
Learning Level
Grades 6-12
Pre-Instruction or Prerequisite Knowledge/Skills
Basic critical analysis, writing, and art skills
Lesson Duration
4-5 sessions, 1-2 hours each
Students may choose to do research outside of class.
Learning Location
Computer lab and/or classroom
Materials
Can of Campbell’s Vegetable Soup, chart paper, Jar of Vlasic Pickles, Computers with Internet connection and printer/paper, poster boards, markers, arts&crafts material
Powerpoint available: [Coming soon]

Learning Objectives (Teacher may wish to modify them as she/he deems necessary: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/teks/)

Grades 6-8

English Language Arts/Reading
TEKS 15B: The student is expected to write to influence such as to persuade, argue, and
request.
15F: The student is expected to compare text events with his/her own and other readers’ experiences.
14A: The student is expected to generate ideas and plans for writing.
Fine Arts (Art)
4A: The student is expected to interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in personal artworks.
2C: The student is expected to demonstrate technical skills effectively, using a variety of art media and materials to produce designs, drawings, paintings, prints, sculptures, ceramics, fiberart, photographic imagery, and electronic media-generated art.

Grades 9-12

English Language Arts/Reading
9B: The student is expected to compare text events with his/her own and other readers' experiences.
Fine Arts (Art)
4A: The student is expected to interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in personal artworks.
2C: The student is expected to demonstrate technical skills effectively, using a variety of art media and materials to produce designs, drawings, paintings, prints, sculptures, ceramics, fiberart, photographic imagery, and electronic media-generated art.

Procedure

1.) Before mentioning Baldemar Velazquez and who he is, teacher will present the can of soup and pickles to students.

2.) In groups of 4-5, students will discuss and write what they know about the two products.

3.) Teacher will write the information on chart paper.

4.) Teacher will ask: Who is a MacArthur genius?

5.) Teacher will use Internet site to discuss the MacArthur Foundation and Fellows (geniuses). www.macfound.org/programs/fel/fel_overview.htm

6.) Teacher will inform students that Baldemar Velazquez is a MacArthur genius.

7.) Teacher will say: the can of soup and jar of pickles are a few of the reasons why Baldemar Velazquez is a genius.

8.) Students will investigate the life and successes of Baldemar Velazquez (Google Scholar, Google, etc.) by focusing on the 5Ws and How. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Ws

Sample Questions: Who is Baldemar Velazquez?; Where does he live or work?; What does he do?; How does he make a difference in the community?; When did he get the MacArthur Fellowship?; Why did he get the fellowship?

9.) Students discuss their research findings on Baldemar Velasquez and teacher will list them on chart paper (5Ws and H). The following is some information regarding Baldemar Velazquez that the teacher may use:

Baldemar Velasquez, human rights activist and founder and president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC) AFL-CIO, was born in Pharr, Texas Feb. 15, 1947. His parents were migrant farmworkers, and Velasquez began working in the fields when he was six, picking berries and tomatoes.He attended Pan American University in Edinburg, Texas from 1965-66. Ohio Northern University in Ada 1966-67 and from 1967-69 attended Bluffton College, where he graduated with a BA in Sociology. He formed Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC) in 1967. During 1989-90, Velasquez received his degree in Practical Theology. He received his advanced degree in 1991 and was ordained that year as Chaplain to the farmworkers by Rapha Ministries. Two major honors came to Velasquez in 1994 when 29 national Hispanic organizations chose him as the recipient of the Hispanic Heritage Leadership Award. That year he also received Mexico's Aguila Azteca Award - the highest award Mexico can give a non-citizen.

10.) Teacher will review concepts ‘human rights’ and ‘self-determination;’
http://www.floc.com/; http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/human%20rights;
http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/self-determination

11.) Students will research current events of human rights’ abuse for farm laborers.

12.) Students will select two causes/missions for farm laborers’ rights, one at the state level (Texas or any other state or Puerto Rico) and the other at the national level. Teacher may wish to focus only on one.

13.) Students will write a letter to each of the causes using a persuasive essay in letter format: http://grants.coehd.utsa.edu/ATE/support/Latino_Genius/Rubric_Letter_Writing.pdf; http://grants.coehd.utsa.edu/ATE/support/Latino_Genius/Rubric_Escribir_una_carta.pdf;
http://grants.coehd.utsa.edu/ATE/support/Latino_Genius/Rubric_Escrito_persuasivo.pdf Teacher may wish to make extra copies.

14.) Students will create posters for their causes. Students may wish to use them in a political demonstration, display them in the classroom, hallway or entry way to the school.

15.) Teacher will conclude the lessons by engaging students in conversation using the following two questions:

· Who is a genius?
· How have the experiences gained through these activities made you think about your future?

Evaluation

The teacher may use the rubrics to assess students or other forms as she/he deems appropriate.

About the Author
Irma Vargas Rosas is first generation Chicana, born and raised in Chicago, IL. She has three degrees from the University of IL, Chicago. She obtained a B.A. in Political Science and Spanish in 1996. Then she continued and obtained two masters degrees: an M.A. in Hispanic Studies specializing in Applied Linguistics in 1998 and M.Ed. specializing in Bilingual Education in 2003. She was a classroom teacher for several years in Chicago and San Antonio, Texas and has experience in dual language, transitional bilingual, and ESL programs. She is currently a doctoral student in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Texas, San Antonio. She currently lives in San Antonio with her partner Rita and their two perritos Corbatín and Lalito.

Latina Genius: Maria Varela


Maria Varela
1999 MacArthur Fellow
One Picture of the People of our Country

Getting to Know a Latina Genius!

Maria Varela is a community organizer living in Albuquerque, NM. Her work focuses on how rural communities, rural cultures and rural ecosystems survive and flourish. The balance among “cultural experiences, ecology, and economic activities either sustain or starve our communities” (MacArthur Latino Fellows Bios).

Introduction
This lesson was developed as part of the Discovering the Genius in You curriculum which is based on the
MacArthur Latino Fellows Bios and the MacArturo Latin@Genius: Locos, Dreamers & Visionaries reunion.

Students will have the opportunity to explore contributions made to U.S. society by Latinos by visiting websites. They will be asked to look for specific Latinos who have been recipients of awards granted by the MacArthur Foundation.

Content Area and Grade Level
This lesson is designed for grades 6-8. Its focus is on contributions of Latinos to historical or contemporary societies, which is appropriate for the 6-8 grade curriculums in the state of Texas.

Curriculum Standards
Outcomes:
Students will:
Identify Latino Geniuses using the 5Ws: who,what,when,where,and why?
Make a timeline that shows the contributions they have made in our community/society.
Design a poster/PowerPoint to inform the community and increase the public's awareness about the contributions of Latinos to society.
Do a presentation explaining the significance, achievements and influence of individuals on society to the class.

Social Studies Standards Addressed:
§113.22. Social Studies, Grade 6.
2) History. The student understands the contributions of individuals and groups from various cultures to selected historical and contemporary societies. The student is expected to:
(A) explain the significance of individuals or groups from selected societies, past and present; and
(B) describe the influence of individual and group achievement on selected historical or contemporary societies.
22) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;
(C) transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and
(D) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.
§113.23. Social Studies, Grade 7
22) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication;
(C) express ideas orally based on research and experiences;
(D) create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies; and
(E) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.
§113.24. Social Studies, Grade 8
(31) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;
(C) transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and
(D) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.

Technology Embedded:
1. BASIC OPERATIONS AND CONCEPTS:
Students demonstrate an understanding of operation of technology systems.
2. TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTIVITY TOOLS:
Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.
Students use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences.
Students use technology to locate, analyze, and collect information from a variety of sources.

Procedures:
Implementation Overview
"Getting to Know a Latino/a Genius!" has been designed for the classroom/library/computer lab setting, where a whole class can work on it at once or student pairs can work together as a computer/library assignment. The lesson is organized so that a pair of students can follow the directions listed below at the computer to complete 11 tasks. Ideally, this project will take about ten, 45-minute lab periods. Here is a sample of how it might go:

Day One
Task 1: As a whole group in the classroom, we will brainstorm what we know and what we would like to learn on a K-W-H-L Chart about Latino/a Geniuses.
Download the K-W-H-L Chart template:
http://www.education-world.com/tools_templates/kwhl_nov2002.doc
Task 2: We will be introduced to the Mission Statement of
"Los MacArturos" and provide an overview of the MacArthur Foundation.
Task 3: As a whole class, we will begin exploring the reasons why Maria Varela is known as a Latino Genius and complete the 5Ws Template to plan and organize the straight news article.
Download a 5 Ws Template
As a large group visit internet sites to read and gather information about Maria Varela and respond to the 5Ws Template and discuss his contributions to society.
Task 4: Discuss Maria Varela’ achievements and influence in society. Also discuss the reasons he was selected as a
MacArthur Foundation Fellow. Create a Timeline using biographical information found in the following internet sites:
http://www.sric.org/voices/2001/v2n2/index.html
http://www.geneseo.edu/news/nrap.php?pg=MariaVarela.html
http://www.takestockphotos.com/pages/varela.html
http://pages.prodigy.net/bluemountain1/bonmf1ii.htm
Task 5: Choose a partner and select a Latino/a` Genius to investigate. The next week you will be working with your partner to do the following on the person you have selected:
1) complete a 5Ws Chart
Download a 5 Ws Template
2) create a timeline
Download the Timeline template:
http://pesd.alevelhigher.com/technology_and_learning/on-line_learning/pdfs/creating_timelines_from_templates.pdf
3) design a poster/PowerPoint
4) present to class the news story

Days Two thru Five
Task 6: Visit Internet sites (listed below) and take notes on each. Complete 5Ws Chart and create timeline.On the third day, ask the students to complete a "Day Three Self-Evaluation."

Days Six and Seven
Task 7: Discussion with another group of students. Use PowerPoint to display findings or concept maps (e.g. Pictures, 5Ws Charts, and Timelines) which shows the contributions made to society by the Latino Geniuses each group is investigating.

Day Eight
Task 8: Class discussion.See 5Ws Charts and Timelines from class discussions
Task 9: Choose an important idea or tip to increase the public's awareness about Latino’s contributions. Make a poster that will be hung in your community.

Days Nine and Ten
Task 10: Complete a self-evaluation rubric.
Task 11: Share work in 3-5 minute presentations.

Resources Needed
Technology stuff you'll need:
At least 2 computers (one with Internet access)
Microsoft Word, or any type of word processing program
PowerPoint Software
Websites your students will access:
http://www.sric.org/voices/2001/v2n2/index.html
http://www.geneseo.edu/news/nrap.php?pg=MariaVarela.html
http://www.takestockphotos.com/pages/varela.html
http://pages.prodigy.net/bluemountain1/bonmf1ii.htm

Human resources you might consider:
A guest speaker Latino Genius or another Latino Leader from the community for more information
An aide or parent helper to guide the students and help out with any computer glitches
On-line teacher support for other ideas and support

Entry Level Skills and Knowledge
Technology stuff your students (and you) will need to know:
How to navigate on the Internet: links, URLs, bookmarks, going back and forth
How to open and save files
How to use word processor to create Timeline
How to use PowerPoint to create concept maps (brainstorms) and presentations

Evaluation
Before students begin any of the 11tasks, they should be provided with a rubric on what they will be evaluated. At the end of the lesson, students will complete an evaluation for themselves, and one for their partner. Click:
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/ to customize a rubric for this lesson.
Students could be evaluated in five areas: Participation, Brainstorm and Notes, Concept Maps (5Ws Chart and Timeline), Poster, and Presentation.
The teacher will review the students self evaluations and make changes or additions as necessary.

Possible Variations
Introduce this project by asking students to name and share stories of Latinos leaders in the community, city, state, country, or countries from where students or their parents have immigrated.
Read literature about Latinos who have made an impact in United States societies.
Get involved. Send letters (snail-mail or e-mail) to public school libraries and local public librarians to add more books, journals, and videos related to Latinos to the library collection.

Conclusion
Through this lesson students will discover more about Latinos in the United States. Encourage them to share what they learn with others to increase the awareness about the contributions that this group has made in U.S. Society.

Last updated on September 29, 2007
by
Lorena Claeys, University of Texas at San Antonio
If there are any questions, comments, or recommendations,feel free to e-mail me. Just click on my name above.


References

This lesson was based on a template from
http://www.instantprojects.org/
The following electronic resources were accessed to gather information to create this lesson plan:
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter113/ch113b.html Chapter 113. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social StudiesSubchapter B. Middle School
http://www.sandracisneros.com/macarturos_schedule_2007.php MacArturos 2007 Reunion

http://www.sandracisneros.com/macarturos_bios.php MacArturos Biographies

http://www.sandracisneros.com/macarturos.php MacArturos Mission Statement

http://www-tc.pbs.org/newshour/extra/teachers/lessonplans/socialstudies/Vote2004/news_h5.pdf

http://pesd.alevelhigher.com/technology_and_learning/on-line_learning/pdfs/creating_timelines_from_templates.pdf
Timelines Microsoft Template
http://www.sric.org/voices/2001/v2n2/index.html The inspiration for this issue of Voices from the Earth started out quite simply - a phone conversation with Maria Varela.
http://www.geneseo.edu/news/nrap.php?pg=MariaVarela.html Maria Varela to Speak at SUNY Geneseo April 2.
http://www.takestockphotos.com/pages/varela.html Take Stock Images of Change
http://pages.prodigy.net/bluemountain1/bonmf1ii.htm Beyond Origins of New Mexico Families-A website maintained by José Antonio Esquibel







Latino Genius: Hipólito Paul Roldán


Lesson Plans created by Lora Beth Escalante

Doctoral student at the University of Texas at San Antonio

Hipólito “Paul” Roldán
Community Developer

MacArthur Genius Aware Honoree 1988

Lesson Plan Title-
Friend of Neighborhoods

Learning Level- Grade level 6-12


Background Information:

Hipólito Paul Roldán is a visionary in the field of housing development for Hispanics, dedicated to building better communities. His creativity is evident in the more than 3,400 affordable apartments and townhouses in Chicago’s predominantly Hispanic neighborhoods that have been constructed during his leadership of the Hispanic Housing Development Corporation (HHDC). Through his mission-oriented mindset, the HHDC has also developed more than 80,000 square feet of retail and office space in an effort to infuse life into underdeveloped areas. Upon receiving the MacArthur genius award in 1988, Mr. Roldán immediately created the Teresa and Hipólito Roldán Community Development Scholarship Fund for young Hispanics pursuing careers in urban planning and real estate development. Over a dozen students have already benefited from his generosity. His other recognitions include Chicago Friend of Neighborhood Award, 2002, and 2005 Builder of the Year by El Nuevo Constructor magazine.

Mr. Roldán worked as a New York City cab driver and served in combat duty in Vietnam before pursuing a bachelor’s degree from St. Francis College and a master’s degree in urban studies from Long Island University in New York. What Hipólito simply calls “doing the right thing” includes the establishment of Tropic Construction, an HHDC subsidiary and general contractor that provides opportunities for low-income people to gain access to construction skills and assignments. Ultimately, Mr. Roldán is an inspirational business leader with a heart of gold. The many communities and boards on which he serves or has served are a testimony to his commitment to the continued success of affordable urban housing development and thoughtful, and strategic community planning.



TEKS standards addressed in this lesson-

(2) History The student understands the contributions of individuals and groups from various cultures to selected historical and contemporary societies. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the significance of individuals or groups from selected societies, past and present; and

(B) describe the influence of individual and group achievement on selected historical or contemporary societies.

(11) Communication- The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, printed copy and monitor displays

Pre-Instruction or Prerequisite Knowledge/Skills-

Basic Internet search capabilities and basic writing skills

Lesson Duration-
2-3 sessions in computer lab, 1-2 hours each
Peer writing/revising sessions, optional

Learning Location-

Computer Lab, classroom

Materials-

Computers with Internet connection and Power Point and printer/paper

Learning Objectives-

Students will be able to explain the significance of Mr. Roldán’s work, including the establishing of over 4,600 residential housing units in Chicago, Illinois for underdeveloped areas and underprivileged residents, the formation of Hispanic Housing Development Corporation (HHDC), and Tropic Construction, a general contractor that provides opportunities for low-income people to gain access to construction trades.
Students will be able to describe past events in Mr. Roldán’s life that led to his personal achievements as well as his contributions to present society.

Procedure-

Explain that the class will be learning about an influential community developer named Hipólito “Paul” Roldán who is based in Chicago, Illinois.
Describe the three choices for final contributions to class after research is complete. Any choice will be presented in the form of Power Point presentation:

a) Students may choose to research the foundation of the Hispanic Housing Development Corporation in Chicago and describe Mr. Roldán’s role as founder and CEO.
b) Students may choose to research Mr. Roldán’s life, detailing how past events in his life led to his contributions to society (timeline).
c) Students may research Tropic Construction, the HHDC subsidiary and general contractor that provides opportunities for low-income people to gain access to the construction trades, and report on how it has positively affected Hispanic communities.

Specify that work should be accomplished individually, but peer revision of work is encouraged.
Take students to computer lab or demonstrate with an LCD projector in class the basic process of constructing a Power Point presentation. Have students experiment with different designs and formats before beginning research.
Students research the topic of their choice.
Allow enough time in class for development of research and presentations.

Evaluation-

Students share their Power Point presentations with the class. Assess their learning with an appropriate presentation and/or writing rubric (see rubric example below).



Lesson 2


Lesson Plan Title- Career pathways

Learning Level-
Grade level 6-12

TEKS standards addressed in this lesson- Knowledge and skills


(2) The student knows how to locate, analyze, and apply career information. The student is expected to:

access career information using print and on-line
resources to complete an educational and/or training plan for a career pathway;

Pre-Instruction or Prerequisite Knowledge/Skills-


§ This lesson should follow lesson on Mr. Roldán’s work
§ Practice with researching information online

Lesson Duration-

1-2 hours

Learning Location-

Classroom, computer lab, community resources

Materials-
Computers with Internet connection and printer/paper, LCD projector
Resources within the school, such as career counselor, advisors.


Learning Objectives-

Students will be able to access career information using print and on-line resources to complete an educational and/or training plan for a career pathway.

Students will be able to access scholarship fund information directly related to the career path that interests them.


Procedure-

1. Share information they have discovered about Mr. Roldán’s career path into urban planning. Activate background knowledge by inquiring about Mr. Roldán’s academic training that enabled him to become a community developer. Where did he study/train? What type of planning was necessary? What sacrifices or financial obligations did his training entail?
2. Demonstrate in the computer lab (or using an LCD projector in your classroom) how to access information about scholarship funds available. Highlight Mr. Roldán’s scholarship fund: Teresa and Hipólito Roldán Community Development Scholarship Fund. Who might benefit from this scholarship? Why do you think Mr. Roldán create this fund?
3. Have student research different scholarship opportunities available in their field of interest. This may be done in partners, as many students will not be familiar with this research venue.
4. Each student will write a one-page summary of their interested field of work and what scholarships or funds are available. Teacher may wish to compile these summaries to share with entire class. This information will help students begin a career path portfolio.

Evaluation-

Students share their findings with the class and/or create a career path display in your classroom with information. Students evaluate classmates on relevant information shared on a sliding scale of 1-4.


Resources:

"Friend of Neighborhoods, 2002." The Chicago Neighborhood Development Awards. 7 Sept. 2007 .

French, Desiree. "Community Builder Profile." Urban Land Institute. 07 Sept. 2007 .

http://www.pointsoflight.org/awards/prescommunityvol/winner_details.cfm?ID=850

Latino Genius: Cecilia Munoz

Critically Engaging the Issue of Immigration
Lesson plan by Carmen Guzman-Martinez, M.A., Doctoral student
Division of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies
October 2007


Various electronic sources documenting the life and work of Cecilia Muñoz:

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0DXK/is_10_17/ai_63817007
http://gale.cengage.com/free_resources/chh/bio/munoz_c.htm

“Cecilia Muñoz was born in Detroit, Michigan on July 27, 1962. Her parents came to the U.S. from La Paz, Bolivia. As an undergraduate student she attended the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. As a graduate student she attended the University of California-Berkeley. Currently, she is the vice president of the office of research, advocacy, and legislation at the National Council of La Raza. Munoz, 37, is a leader in immigration and civil rights policy and is a major force in such issues as the legalization of undocumented immigrants, family-based immigration rights, and access to welfare benefits and education. Her accomplishments include working as the head of Legalization Outreach Programs (Catholic Charities) in Chicago in 1996, Muñoz assisted 5,000 immigrants obtain U.S. citizenship. In this organization, she continues to work as an advocate and activist against discrimination, inhumane welfare reform for immigrants, and inhumane immigration policy. Muñoz has also spoken against anti-immigration groups.”

http://www.macfound.org/:
“The MacArthur Fellows Program awards unrestricted fellowships to talented individuals who have shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self- direction. There are three criteria for selection of Fellows: exceptional creativity, promise for important future advances based on a track record of significant accomplishment, and potential for the fellowship to facilitate subsequent creative work. The MacArthur Fellows Program is intended to encourage people of outstanding talent to pursue their own creative, intellectual, and professional inclinations. In keeping with this purpose, the Foundation awards fellowships directly to individuals rather than through institutions. Recipients may be writers, scientists, artists, social scientists, humanists, teachers, entrepreneurs, or those in other fields, with or without institutional affiliations. They may use their fellowship to advance their expertise, engage in bold new work, or, if they wish, to change fields or alter the direction of their careers.”

Lesson Plan Title
Critically Engaging the Issue of Immigration

Learning Level
Grade level 11-12

TEKS Standards
113.32 United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (One Credit):
(24) Social studies skills: The student applies critical thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to: (G) support a point of view on a social studies issue or event.

Pre-Instruction or Prerequisite Knowledge/Skills
Basic Internet search capabilities
Basic writing skills
Understanding of what a state representative is and does

Lesson Duration
5 sessions, 1-2 hours each

Learning Location
Computer Lab, online, and in classroom

Materials
· Local newspaper
· Stamps (2 per student)
· Computers with Internet connection and printer/paper

Learning Objectives
· Students will learn about Cecilia Muñoz and her work with the National Council of La Raza.
· Students will support a point of view on the issue of immigration by writing letters to their community’s local newspaper and state representative.

Procedure
1.) Teacher will present a lecture about Cecilia Muñoz.

2.) Students will use the internet to search for information about the National Council of La
Raza:
http://www.nclr.org/

3.) Students will use the internet to search for information about immigration:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration

3.) Using the attached sheet of questions, students will take notes on the three topics of
Cecilia Muñoz, the National Council of La Raza, and immigration.

4.) Students will use the local or national newspaper to learn how to write letters to the
editor:
http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/NEAreaOffice/lettereditor.htm

http://www.mysanantonio.com/opinion/

5.) Students will work in groups (3-4 students) and discuss opinions on immigration.

6.) Students will take an individual stance on the issue of immigration (for or against).

7.) Students will write a “Letter to the Editor” expressing their stance and mail them.

8.) Students will use the internet to search for their state representative:
http://www.house.state.tx.us/resources/faq.htm#who_rep

9.) Students will learn how to write a letter to his or her state representative:
http://www.chabotcollege.edu/Library/abby/letterstoreps.html

10.) Students will write a letter to their state representative and mail them.

Latino Genius: Hugo Morales

Hugo Morales
1999 MacArthur Fellow

one picture of the people of our country

Getting to Know a Latino Genius!

Hugo Morales is the Executive Director of Radio Bilingüe, Inc. In October 1976, Mr. Morales and an all-volunteer staff of current and former farm workers and artists founded Radio Bilingüe, which began radio broadcast operation on July 4, 1980 over the entire San Joaquin Valley. Mr. Morales is responsible for the administration Bilingüe of Radio (MacArthur Latino Fellows Bios).

“Here in the Central Valley, we have migrants who come from the most remote parts of Mexico, places where radio is the medium. We're using the latest technology to try to help people swap news and advice across a political border.”


“It goes beyond connecting families. It's about preserving our culture, something corporate radio won't address.”

Introduction
This lesson was developed as part of the Discovering the Genius in You curriculum which is based on the MacArthur Latino Fellows Bios and the http://www.sandracisneros.com/macarturos_schedule_2007.php.
Students will have the opportunity to explore contributions made to U.S. society by Latinos by visiting websites. They will be asked to look for specific Latinos who have been recipients of awards granted by the MacArthur Foundation.

Content Area and Grade Level
This lesson is designed for grades 6-8. Its focus is on contributions of Latinos to historical or contemporary societies, which is appropriate for the 6-8 grade curriculums in the state of Texas.
Curriculum Standards
Outcomes:
Students will:

1. Identify Latino Geniuses using the 5Ws: who, what, when, where, and why?
2. Make a timeline that shows the contributions they have made in our community/society.
3. Design a poster/PowerPoint to inform the community and increase the public's awareness about the contributions of Latinos to society.
4. Do a presentation explaining the significance, achievements and influence of individuals on society to the class.

Social Studies Standards Addressed:
§113.22. Social Studies, Grade 6.
2) History. The student understands the contributions of individuals and groups from various cultures to selected historical and contemporary societies. The student is expected to:
(A) explain the significance of individuals or groups from selected societies, past and present; and
(B) describe the influence of individual and group achievement on selected historical or contemporary societies.
22) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;
(C) transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and
(D) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.
§113.23. Social Studies, Grade 7
22) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication;
(C) express ideas orally based on research and experiences;
(D) create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies; and
(E) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.
§113.24. Social Studies, Grade 8
(31) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;
(C) transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and
(D) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.


Technology Embedded:
1. BASIC OPERATIONS AND CONCEPTS:
Students demonstrate an understanding of operation of technology systems.
2. TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTIVITY TOOLS:
Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.
Students use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences.
Students use technology to locate, analyze, and collect information from a variety of sources.


Procedures:

Implementation Overview
"Getting to Know a Latino/a Genius!" has been designed for the classroom/library/computer lab setting, where a whole class can work on it at once or student pairs can work together as a computer/library assignment. The lesson is organized so that a pair of students can follow the directions listed below at the computer to complete 11 tasks. Ideally, this project will take about ten, 45-minute lab periods. Here is a sample of how it might go:

Day One
Task 1: As a whole group in the classroom, we will brainstorm what we know and what we would like to learn on a K-W-H-L Chart about Latino/a Geniuses.
Download the K-W-H-L Chart template:
http://www.education-world.com/tools_templates/kwhl_nov2002.doc
Task 2: We will be introduced to the Mission Statement of "Los MacArturos" and provide an overview of the MacArthur Foundation.
Task 3: As a whole class, we will begin exploring the reasons why Hugo Morales is known as a Latino Genius and complete the 5Ws Template to plan and organize the straight news article.
Download a 5 Ws Template
As a large group visit internet sites to read and gather information about Hugo Morales and respond to the 5Ws Template and discuss his contributions to society.
Task 4: Discuss Hugo Morales’ achievements and influence in society. Also discuss the reasons he was selected as a MacArthur Foundation Fellow. Create a Timeline using biographical information found in the following internet sites:
http://www.hablamosjuntos.org/signage/signage_oversight/pac.asp
http://www.radiobilingue.org/archive/03_03_14_hugomorales.htm
http://www.cpb.org/pressroom/release.php?prn=146
http://www.cpec.ca.gov/Commission/MemberPage.ASP?CM=35
http://www.current.org/people/peop909morales.html
http://www.lannan.org/lf/bios/detail/hugo-morales/
Task 5: Choose a partner and select a Latino/a` Genius to investigate. The next week you will be working with your partner to do the following on the person you have selected:
1) complete a 5Ws Chart Download a 5 Ws Template
2) create a Timeline
Download the Timeline template:
http://pesd.alevelhigher.com/technology_and_learning/on-line_learning/pdfs/creating_timelines_from_templates.pdf
3) design a poster/PowerPoint
4) present to class the news story

Days Two thru Five
Task 6: Visit Internet sites (listed below) and take notes on each. Complete 5Ws Chart and create timeline.On the third day, ask the students to complete a "Day Three Self-Evaluation."

Days Six and Seven
Task 7: Discussion with another group of students. Use PowerPoint to display findings or concept maps (e.g. Pictures, 5Ws Charts, and Timelines) which shows the contributions made to society by the Latino Geniuses each group is investigating.

Day Eight
Task 8: Class discussion.See 5Ws Charts and Timelines from class discussions
Task 9: Choose an important idea or tip to increase the public's awareness about Latino’s contributions. Make a poster that will be hung in your community.

Days Nine and Ten
Task 10: Complete a self-evaluation rubric.
Task 11: Share work in 3-5 minute presentations.

Resources Needed
Technology stuff you'll need:
At least 2 computers (one with Internet access)
Microsoft Word, or any type of word processing program
PowerPoint Software
Websites your students will access:
http://www.hablamosjuntos.org/signage/signage_oversight/pac.asp
http://www.radiobilingue.org/archive/03_03_14_hugomorales.htm
http://www.cpb.org/pressroom/release.php?prn=146
http://www.cpec.ca.gov/Commission/MemberPage.ASP?CM=35
http://www.current.org/people/peop909morales.html
http://www.lannan.org/lf/bios/detail/hugo-morales/


Human resources you might consider:
A guest speaker Latino Genius or another Latino Leader from the community for more information.
An aide or parent helper to guide the students and help out with any computer glitches
On-line teacher support for other ideas and support .

Entry Level Skills and Knowledge
Technology stuff your students (and you) will need to know:
How to navigate on the Internet: links, URLs, bookmarks, going back and forth
How to open and save files
How to use word processor to create Timeline
How to use PowerPoint to create concept maps (brainstorms) and presentations

Evaluation
Before students begin any of the 11tasks, they should be provided with a rubric on what they will be evaluated. At the end of the lesson, students will complete an evaluation for themselves, and one for their partner. Click: http://rubistar.4teachers.org/ to customize a rubric for this lesson.
Students could be evaluated in five areas: Participation, Brainstorm and Notes, Concept Maps (5Ws Chart and Timeline), Poster, and Presentation.
The teacher will review the students self evaluations and make changes or additions as necessary.

Possible Variations
Introduce this project by asking students to name and share stories of Latinos leaders in the community, city, state, country, or countries from where students or their parents have immigrated.
Read literature about Latinos who have made an impact in United States societies.
Get involved. Send letters (snail-mail or e-mail) to public school libraries and local public librarians to add more books, journals, and videos related to Latinos to the library collection.

Conclusion
Through this lesson students will discover more about Latinos in the United States. Encourage them to share what they learn with others to increase the awareness about the contributions that this group has made in U.S. Society.

Last updated on September 29, 2007
by Lorena Claeys, University of Texas at San Antonio
If there are any questions, comments, or recommendations,feel free to e-mail me.Just click on my name above.

References

This lesson was based on a template from http://www.instantprojects.org/
The following electronic resources were accessed to gather information to create this lesson plan:

http://www.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter113/ch113b.html Chapter 113. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social StudiesSubchapter B. Middle School

http://www.sandracisneros.com/macarturos_schedule_2007.php MacArturos 2007 Reunion

http://www.sandracisneros.com/macarturos_bios.php MacArturos Biographies

http://www.sandracisneros.com/macarturos.php MacArturos Mission Statement

http://www-tc.pbs.org/newshour/extra/teachers/lessonplans/socialstudies/Vote2004/news_h5.pdf 5Ws Template

http://pesd.alevelhigher.com/technology_and_learning/on-line_learning/pdfs/creating_timelines_from_templates.pdf
Timelines Microsoft Template


http://www.hablamosjuntos.org/signage/signage_oversight/pac.asp Advisory Committee Bios

http://www.radiobilingue.org/archive/03_03_14_hugomorales.htm Hugo Morales is the Executive Director of Radio Bilingüe, Inc. In 1976, Mr. Morales and an all-volunteer staff of farmworkers, former farmworkers, and artists founded Radio Bilingüe, which began radio broadcast operation on July 4, 1980 over the entire San Joaquin Valley.

http://www.cpb.org/pressroom/release.php?prn=146 Washington, D.C., May 15, 1999 -- The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) has named Hugo Morales, founder and Executive Director of Radio Bilingue, the recipient of the 23rd annual Edward R. Murrow Award, public radios highest honor.

http://www.cpec.ca.gov/Commission/MemberPage.ASP?CM=35 Hugo Morales was appointed to the California Postsecondary Education Commission by the Senate Rules Committee on June 11, 2003, to represent the general public.

http://www.current.org/people/peop909morales.html Radio Bilingue's Hugo Morales receives the Murrow

http://www.lannan.org/lf/bios/detail/hugo-morales/ Detailed Biographical Information